Sony Resets PSN Passwords Amid “Irregular Activity”

Sony has reset some user’s passwords on the PSN. This is another occurrence of password resets after a similar incident a few weeks ago. If you ran a network that was subject to a massive hack that led to it being switched off for a month, you’d probably be a bit jumpy about security too. And that’s not a bad thing.

That’s what happened, they detected “irregular activity” and reset the passwords, sending out an email to warn users that their log in credentials wouldn’t work and they’d need to use the “Forgot your password” option to set a new one and get signed in. It’s a precautionary measure and there’s no indication that any access to your PSN content or information was given to nefarious types.

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There’s also no suggestion that the PSN itself was compromised in any way but there have been a number of high profile hacks recently where email addresses and, potentially, passwords were uncovered from other company’s databases.

My own details were lost by Adobe at the start of November and my email appears on the list of those compromised that pwnedlist.com holds. If you want to check your own, simply enter it at that website and, if it appears on their lists they’ll give you a date. Search for that date on this website and you’ll see where your email address was lost.

It makes sense to use unique passwords anywhere you sign in and to change them from time to time, even if you don’t suspect that you’ve been exposed.

Source: The Verge

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22 Comments

  1. Yeah, this happened to me this morning

  2. Me too. Not on the pwnedlist thankfully .

  3. Had to change mine last night on my laptop. As soon as I did, it logged me in again on my PS4 without asking me for my new password.

    • It did that to me too this morning. So I logged out and when I logged in again it did ask for the new password

  4. Maybe Sony should follow the likes of Blizzard/Banks with the authenticators – the majority of people have a smart phone or tablet these days, why not create a simple iOS/Android authenticator?

    • There are loads of people with smart phones or tablets but I bet the number that don’t will run into the hundreds of thousands worldwide, probably more.

      • Yeah I don’t mean mandatory, merely an extra layer of security for those with an android or ios device. Blizzard also created standalone authenticators which were pretty cheap as an option for people without a smartphone/tablet etc.

  5. Looks like either Sony, Adobe, Netflix or PayPal leaked my email.

    Damn them!

    • That’ll be November 11th then, same for me, although it’s an old email and non of my current ones have, so it’s either a legacy email being held or Netflix.

      • Spot on. Better change some passwords.

  6. According to that, mine is on Adobe. Fucking cock suckers. Fed up with this now. I might just give completely fake information out to all websites from now on.

  7. Unfortunately, security is never the main priority for network owners, they always do the minimum they can to save money. Nice to see Sony doing some sort of pro-active analysis tho.

    Wearing my IT security hat for a moment, as the article states, you should always use different passwords for each site. Personally, I use LastPass.com and generate a strong random password for each site and the Chrome plugin enters the details for me, so I only have to remember the password to unlock the lastpass vault.

    Its got a nice Android app too (probably an IOS one as well).

  8. It might have been nice of Sony to email people to say they’d reset the password, rather than leaving it until you try and log in.

    Of course, it would happen to me the day my PS4 finally arrives. (After 24 hours of the exciting game of “tracking your parcel as it slowly orbits your address before going back to the delivery office for the night”)

  9. Thanks for the info, found 3 of my mail accounts on there. Were all registered with one company, thanks a lot, Adobe.

  10. Had to change mine this morning. I’d rather change my password than have the PSN hacked again so I think Sony did the right thing.

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