No UMD Conversion For ‘go

Got a bunch of UMD-based PSP games in the bottom of your cupboard? Planning to upgrade your current PSP for one of the new-fangled PSPgos?  Then you are going to be disappointed.  You will not be able to transfer your games from your UMDs to your ‘go as Sony had suggested you would at E3.

An SCEA spokesman has told Kotaku, “We were evaluating a UMD conversion program, but due to legal and technical reasons we will not be offering the program at this time”.

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So there you have it.  One less reason to upgrade from your still-going-strong PSP-1/2/3000.  Of course this news has less impact on those new to the PSP platform who will be picking up a ‘go when they are released next month.

Sony really are banking on attracting a raft of new PlayStation Portable customers to the ‘go but we have yet to see much of an advertising push to raise its profile outside of the existing gamer community.  Continuing reports of retailers deciding not to stock it will not help it into the view of potential customers.

Add to the mix Sony’s TGS announcement that they are dropping the price of the PSP-3000 by 15% in Japan (and only Japan) as well as the fact that downloadable games will be sold at “pricing parity” with their UMD brethren and surely the ‘go is becoming an even less desirable proposition.

Even the Cable Converter we saw yesterday almost seems designed to put people off upgrading.  Sure you could use it to attach your Go!Explore GPS receiver but if you wanted to use that for a long trip in the car there is no way you could then plug in the Car Adaptor as the PSPgo’s solitary multi-function connector is occupied.  That’s on top of destroying the big selling point of the ‘go; that it is smaller and lighter than existing PSPs.

Now some of you may well just point out that I have not exactly been a staunch supporter of the PSPgo even from the days when it was still just a rumour but it is sounding increasingly like an experiment.  One that has not got enough backing to make it a success.  Is there any evidence to the contrary?

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